chadmsirois:

Wassily Kandinsky - Moonrise, 1903

chadmsirois:

Wassily Kandinsky - Moonrise, 1903

(via bobschofield)

spring thingies my mother helped me to make  spring thingies my mother helped me to make  spring thingies my mother helped me to make 

spring thingies my mother helped me to make 

since feeling is first
who pays any attention
to the syntax of things
will never wholly kiss you;

wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world

my blood approves,
and kisses are a far better fate
than wisdom
lady i swear by all flowers. Don’t cry
—the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids’ flutter which says

we are for eachother: then
laugh, leaning back in my arms
for life’s not a paragraph

And death i think is no parenthesis


e.e. cummings

The Feeling Begins

Passion (OST The Last Temptation of Christ) 

Peter Gabriel

mi fa sol la mi ré ré mi fa sol sol sol ré do 
καραμούζα!



Chanson des jumelles
Les Demoiselles de Rochefort
1967 Jacques Demy

nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook nevver:

Some symptoms, Dan Estabrook

“You see, I want a lot.
Maybe I want it all:
the darkness of each endless fall,
the shimmering light of each ascent.
So many are alive who don’t seem to care.
Casual, easy, they move in the world
as though untouched.
But you take pleasure in the faces
of those who know they thirst.
You cherish those
who grip you for survival.
You are not dead yet, it’s not too late
to open your depths by plunging into them
and drink in the life
that reveals itself quietly there.”

Rainer Maria Rilke

artmastered:

Henri Matisse, The Plum Blossoms, 1948, oil on canvas, 115.9 cm × 88.9 cm, MoMA, New York

artmastered:

Henri Matisse, The Plum Blossoms, 1948, oil on canvas, 115.9 cm × 88.9 cm, MoMA, New York

(via toparisfromtokyo)

uvre:

Rei Kawakubo, Donald Drawbertson.

υπέροχο 

(via fatalfashion)

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

"We have a word for that in Japanese," he said. "It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally."

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

"I don’t think it’s like the pillow word." He clapped his hands three or four times. "The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness, But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb."

— Rogert Ebert, on Hayao Miyazaki (via ericrohmer)

(via ericrohmer)

ca-tsuka:

"Le Roi et l’oiseau" (1980).Directed by Paul Grimault.Backgrounds. ca-tsuka:

"Le Roi et l’oiseau" (1980).Directed by Paul Grimault.Backgrounds.

ca-tsuka:

"Le Roi et l’oiseau" (1980).
Directed by Paul Grimault.
Backgrounds.